Consider safety when building a walking route

When pedestrians are involved in car accidents, their damages are significantly more severe than vehicle drivers or passengers. Every walking route in New York must be designed with optimal safety in mind.

Proximity to busy roads and highways

The first factor to consider for a walkway is its proximity to busy roads and highways where hundreds of cars pass every day. It’s rarely a good idea to have a sidewalk only inches away from a busy highway that extends for miles until it connects to another busy highway. In some cases, this type of sidewalk is unavoidable, and it’s better than having none at all and forcing people to walk through the grass.

To make the sidewalk safer, it should be built several feet from the curb that leads onto the road. This way, if a pedestrian trips or leaps to the side, he or she won’t accidentally fall directly onto the road. This is the safest method needed to prevent pedestrian accidents on crowded roadways.

Severe weather conditions

In most cities, weather conditions intensify during certain times of the year. There are heat waves along with severe flooding, freezing temperatures, ice and other issues. In downtown areas, some entire roads and sidewalks flood, leaving people and cars several feet deep in water. Other walkways may be located in hot areas where there are no trees for shade. It’s very important to protect the safety of pedestrians and avoid building a walking route where it is too dangerous to travel throughout the year.

Who can help in case of an accident?

The city is responsible for creating a walking route that is safe for all travelers. Pedestrians who have been injured due to local government negligence or the actions of an individual driver may want to seek compensation.