Non-union workers face construction accident risks

Anyone who works at a New York construction site faces injury risks. Workers could spend years on the job without incident, but heavy equipment, moving vehicles, heights, and other work environment-related dangers present ever-present risks. Both union and non-union workers have to be careful, but statistics show that non-union personnel may face even more hazardous circumstances.

Non-union workers and construction site injuries

If a tool slips out of someone’s hands and falls to ground level, a worker might suffer a head injury. A generally careful professional could get cut with a saw blade, leading to a severe injury. All workers have to be mindful of dangers, and these incidents could happen to union and non-union workers alike. However, the New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (NYCOSH) produced a 2018 report that revealed non-union workers might face far greater risks.

The report noted that 86% of fatally injured workers were non-union personnel. The report suggested that non-union job sites suffered from fewer rigorous safety inspections than union sites.

Thorough inspections could uncover problems workers don’t know about, such as a poorly assembled or damaged scaffold. When a union inspector finds issues, a fix may be forthcoming. No inspections or cursory inspections might lead to otherwise avoidable construction site accidents.

Compensation for accidents

Construction site accidents happen for many reasons. Loose electrical wires may cause shocks or untidy workspaces, leading to slip-and-fall accidents. Poor safety equipment doesn’t help anyone.

Injuries may range in severity. As noted, fatal accidents occur, and so do ones that cause lengthy or short-term recovery times. Regardless of the severity, an injured worker may seek compensation to cover lost wages and other expenses. Full-time employees might file for workers’ compensation, although they could also sue under specific circumstances. Independent contractors might have no other option but to sue. That said, a liability insurance claim may be an approach to explore.